The Collect Call: Jesus Said, “Love the Trolls”

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What Bible verse was it where Jesus said to “Love the trolls?” Plus, reflections on the collect for proper 12, allegedly one of the most frequently memorized prayers (call us skeptical). Also: buy a lying down desk for Holli!

This week’s collect:

O God, the protector of all who trust in you, without whom nothing is strong, nothing is holy: Increase and multiply upon us your mercy; that, with you as our ruler and guide, we may so pass through things temporal, that we lose not the things eternal; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

(Book of Common Prayer, page 231)

Featured music:
“Let All Mortal Flesh Keep Silence” performed by Aaron Devries, distributed under a CC BY-NC-SA license.

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The Collect Call is a founding member of the Via Media Collective, a network of podcasts with an Anglican sensibility. Follow the collective on Twitter and Facebook.

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The Collect Call: For Peace (with the DioWeMo Youth)

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As the youth of the Diocese of West Missouri made their way east for a pilgrimage, they stopped for the night at the Episcopal Church of All Saints, Indianapolis, and we recorded a show.

This week’s collect:

Eternal God, in whose perfect kingdom no sword is drawn but the sword of righteousness, no strength known but the strength of love: So mightily spread abroad your Spirit, that all peoples may be gathered under the banner of the Prince of Peace, as children of one Father; to whom be dominion and glory, now and for ever. Amen.

(Book of Common Prayer, page 815)

Featured music:
“Let All Mortal Flesh Keep Silence” performed by Aaron Devries, distributed under a CC BY-NC-SA license.

How to listen

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The Collect Call is a founding member of the Via Media Collective, a network of podcasts with an Anglican sensibility. Follow the collective on Twitter and Facebook.

More about this podcast

Your Church’s Free Welcome Video for Fall

Your friends at the Acts 8 Movement are glad to offer the Episcopal Church a video for congregations to promote their church as kids start heading back to school. The video above is our gift to you. You may post it as is, or you can download a high resolution video to upload to your congregation’s Facebook page.

We hope this video can be a key component in a plan to invite your neighbors to church this fall. To make the most of the opportunity, we encourage you to review the Hospitality Checklist offered by Invite-Welcome-Connect.

Thank Yous
Nurya Love Parish provided the initial script. Holli Powell recorded the English language audio. Eliza Pankey provided The Episcopal Church Welcomes You. Sandra Montes translated the video into Spanish and provided the voiceover for that version of the video, with her goddaughter Jaidani Ortiz closing out the voiceover. David Simmons created the original score and Frank Logue edited the video. This means the collaboration involved Episcopalians in Michigan, Kentucky, Florida, Texas, California, Wisconsin, and Georgia, working together on the two versions of this 1-minute video.

Customizing this Video
Those with video editing skill may customize the video. You could add your church name, the URL of the church website, or the logo to the video itself. You may even add a photo from your congregation with some information during “The Episcopal Church Welcomes You.” But we have discovered that lengthening the video to add service times or additional information leads to viewers tuning out en masse. We recommend putting the real content of the ad in the Facebook post text rather than in the video itself.

Download the Files
The files you need are linked below. Simply Right Click the links to save the files, then upload to your congregation’s Facebook page as a video. Add a brief invite and service times and you are done. Or just embed or link the YouTube video above or any of these videos at our Acts8 YouTube Channel.

English language version MP4 file:
episcopalfallwelcome.mp4

Spanish language version MP4 file:
episcopalfallwelcome-spanish.mp4

Advertise on Facebook
We encourage you to use this video as if it were your own in sharing the Good News. The following tutorial is provided to walk you through the process of downloading the video from this post, uploading it to Facebook, and creating a Facebook ad. Although it uses the Easter video, the process is the same.

Facebook automatically plays videos uploaded to the site which is why we recommend this option. If the downloading and uploading process is a challenge, feel free to simply post a link to the video on YouTube in your invitation.

To find out more of what we have discovered along the way, please read Nurya Love Parish’s helpful post 7 Lessons from the Video Experiment

There is no charge for using this video, it is simply our gift to you.

In Christ,
The Acts 8 Movement

A Note About Permissions
You may use this video without concern for copyright infringement or incurring any fees for this usage. 
We created this video using original video recorded for this project together with clips purchased from videoblock.com and are using them within that licensing agreement. Everyone participating donated their time and work product to the project, and the parents of the two children whose voices are in the video approve of their taking part in the project.

The Collect Call: For Proper 9

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This coming Sunday is July 3…but avoid the temptation to use the Independence Day propers!

This week’s collect:

O God, you have taught us to keep all your commandments by loving you and our neighbor: Grant us the grace of your Holy Spirit, that we may be devoted to you with our whole heart, and united to one another with pure affection; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

(Book of Common Prayer, page 230)

Featured music:
“Let All Mortal Flesh Keep Silence” performed by Aaron Devries, distributed under a CC BY-NC-SA license.

How to listen

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The Collect Call is a founding member of the Via Media Collective, a network of podcasts with an Anglican sensibility. Follow the collective on Twitter and Facebook.

More about this podcast

The Collect Call: For Proper 8

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Brendan geeks out over this collect, and Holli is like, meh. Also, an irreverent solution to how confusing it is to tell Elijah and Elisha apart.

This week’s collect:

Almighty God, you have built your Church upon the foundation of the apostles and prophets, Jesus Christ himself being the chief cornerstone: Grant us so to be joined together in unity of spirit by their teaching, that we may be made a holy temple acceptable to you; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

(Book of Common Prayer, page 230)

Featured Link: Confessions of a Lapsed Contemporanian, by the Rt. Rev. Dan Edwards

Featured music:
“Let All Mortal Flesh Keep Silence” performed by Aaron Devries, distributed under a CC BY-NC-SA license.

How to listen

■ iTunes ■ Stitcher ■ Soundcloud ■ RSS FeedBlubrry

How to Connect

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The Collect Call is a founding member of the Via Media Collective, a network of podcasts with an Anglican sensibility. Follow the collective on Twitter and Facebook.

More about this podcast

The Collect Call: For Proper 8

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Does God really help and govern those set on the foundation of God’s loving-kindness? Plus, demons, pigs, and why people need to stop saying “you don’t have to check your brain at the door” of the Episcopal Church.

This week’s collect:

O Lord, make us have perpetual love and reverence for your holy Name, for you never fail to help and govern those whom you have set upon the sure foundation of your loving-kindness; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

(Book of Common Prayer, page 230)

Featured music:
“Let All Mortal Flesh Keep Silence” performed by Aaron Devries, distributed under a CC BY-NC-SA license.

How to listen

■ iTunes ■ Stitcher ■ Soundcloud ■ RSS FeedBlubrry

How to Connect

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The Collect Call is a founding member of the Via Media Collective, a network of podcasts with an Anglican sensibility. Follow the collective on Twitter and Facebook.

More about this podcast

The Collect Call: For the Feast of St. Barnabas

An Exclusive Collect Call Filmstrip
St. Barnabas the Apostle: A Filmstrip by The Collect Call (image: By Gerhard Haubold (Own work) [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons)
St. Barnabas the Apostle was the wind beneath Paul’s wings…so we don’t really give him the attention he deserves. This week, we do what we can to rectify that.This week’s prayer:

Grant, O God, that we may follow the example of your faithful servant Barnabas, who, seeking not his own renown but the well-being of your Church, gave generously of his life and substance for the relief of the poor and the spread of the Gospel; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

(Book of Common Prayer, page 241)

Featured music:
“Let All Mortal Flesh Keep Silence” performed by Aaron Devries, distributed under a CC BY-NC-SA license.

How to listen

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How to Connect

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The Collect Call is a founding member of the Via Media Collective, a network of podcasts with an Anglican sensibility. Follow the collective on Twitter and Facebook.

More about this podcast

The Collect Call: Live from eFormation 2016

 

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From left to right: Joe McGarry, Mihee Kim-Kort, Casey Fitzgerald, and Brendan OSullivan-Hale. Photo: Regina Heater

Live from the eFormation 2016 conference at Virginia Theological Seminary – four podcasters reflect on some creative high points and how they came to be. Featuring Casey Fitzgerald of Story Divine, Mihee Kim-Kort of This Everyday Holy, Joe McGarry of Two Bald Pastors, and Brendan O’Sullivan-Hale of The Collect Call.

Music by Aaron Devries, distributed under a CC BY-NC-SA license.

Thanks to Kyle Oliver, Lisa Kimball, and all the organizers of the eFormation 2016 conference for making this possible, and to Regina Heater for audience wrangling.

 

How to listen

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The Collect Call is a founding member of the Via Media Collective, a network of podcasts with an Anglican sensibility. Follow the collective on Twitter and Facebook.

More about this podcast

The Collect Call: Proper 5

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Wherein Brendan officially shows his age by revealing he knows how to read the Wall Street Journal on Snapchat, but can’t do anything else, Holli recommends a Britney Spears deep cut, and we also give trustworthy preaching advice.

This week’s collect:

O God, from whom all good proceeds: Grant that by your inspiration we may think those things that are right, and by your merciful guiding may do them; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

(Book of Common Prayer, page 229)

Featured Link: How God Messed Up My Happy Atheist Life

Featured music:
“Let All Mortal Flesh Keep Silence” performed by Aaron Devries, distributed under a CC BY-NC-SA license.

How to listen

■ iTunes ■ Stitcher ■ Soundcloud ■ RSS FeedBlubrry

How to Connect

Twitter ■ Facebook ■ Pinterest

The Collect Call is a founding member of the Via Media Collective, a network of podcasts with an Anglican sensibility. Follow the collective on Twitter and Facebook.

More about this podcast

BLOGFORCE ROUNDUP – Gathering the Generations for General Convention

BlogforceVerticalLast week, the question was posed to the BLOGFORCE:

According the Pew Research, adult GenXers and Millennials now outnumber Baby Boomers by nearly 2 to 1, but when we look at General Convention the statistics don’t match up.  In what ways can the Church create opportunities to lift up younger leaders, lay and ordained, to serve as Deputies to General Convention?“

We received several responses, which are listed in the order received


Joe Parrish blogged:

In general, younger people are not leaders because they have few if any to lead. Some few lead teams to feed the homeless in some churches, with their parents’ guidance, but in general TEC itself does not have venues for younger people to lead, and that is reflected throughout the church; and vice versa. If we have ways to raise up leaders in our parishes, then we might find ways to raise up leaders in our dioceses, and thus for TEC. In general the leadership process has worked through the ordination process, and has omitted other access to potential leadership. So we thus need to find non-ordination ways of raising up young leaders. To wait until someone is a success in business, or has become a lawyer or accountant or doctor is to stymie young leadership. To seat a young person on a Vestry often omits the need to have people of substance and generosity in those seats, as younger people usually do not have earning power, jobs, or experience. And if they begin an endeavor right after high school, they are generally consumed by that. So the challenge is to find young entrepreneurs, self-starters. They will have a different orientation to the church as it exists, however, so learning how to guide a great ship with little ship experience is the challenge. We face the problem of putting new wine in old wineskins. So TEC needs to found new wineskins in order to nurture new wine. We need new parishes to be formed even if there are old ones still there. Opportunities need to be discerned in order to begin a process of producing new wine skins who will nurture new wine.

Andrea McKellar blogged:

Andrea McKellar was a first time deputy to the 2015 General Convention at the “youngish” age of 36 from The Episcopal Church in South Carolina. She shares her experience in being raised up as a leader in The Episcopal Church as an example of what works and challenges other dioceses to go out and find people. Young adults want to change the world but sometimes they needed an extra push to get a seat at the table.

Miranda Hassett blogged:

Many people in this age group have or will have young kids. Going to Convention without your kids is hard and sad, even if you’re lucky enough not to have to worry about arranging extra childcare at home, sacrificing family vacation time, etc. And going to Convention with your kids is quite expensive. Let’s do better next time with that second point?

In addition, there were many comments on the post on Facebook.  Some examples are posted anonymously below:

Schedule diocesan conventions outside business hours, provide childcare and focus clergy on looking for folks who know little about polity

Some equivalent of term limits. Only electable so many times.

Figure out a way so those of us who don’t work for the church professionally (either lay or ordained) don’t have to take so many vacation days to attend.

Make General Convention interesting and engaging and much shorter.

Not make it two weeks. If you even get a paid vacation, general convention takes it all. And if you have kids, childcare becomes an issue. And make a connection between General Convention and the parish-I have a hard time seeing that connection very often as clergy, much less as someone who doesn’t work in the church.

I had a clergy person I deeply respect tell me it took her five general conventions as a delegate to feel like she knew what was going on (and she’s intelligent and capable). I was still in high school when she first started going. Why is it so unwieldy that this is the case? That it takes years and years? Maybe we need to set term limits on delegates.

What is required is for our older saints to begin actively mentoring younger people and gradually and willingly stepping aside to allow new leaders to emerge. Not always easy, but our failure to learn to do this will be our undoing. It takes great generosity of spirit to give up ones prestigious, well earned position of authority to help the church breath and grow.

Respectfully Submitted,
David Simmons, BLOGFORCE Wing Commander